Philosophy of Street, Street, Street Photography by streetshooter - tagged: , ,

April 6th, 2017 … Thoughts, Photos & Mojo … Fuji X100F

David inducted this to Flickr Explore…. Thank

Many cameras will do the job that is required of it. I don’t dispute that. Many cameras are excellent for reasons that are built into it. Andre’ the Fuji X100F does all that but also has MOJO in him. Let’s not tell Fujifilm or the X-Shooters about this cause then we will have to start paying for replicated MOJO. I did not have to send Andre’ to Louisiana and get MOJO installed. Ok, come close and listen up for a min. Closer, closer….we ain’t a wantin’ others to learn about this MOJO stuff. See, photographic MOJO is when you are aware that everything at the moment you are experiencing is at one with you and you with it. Some call this being in the moment but it’s really part of the MOJO. What makes it MOJO is that the camera adds to the extended experience of making photos. Mojo is Magic Of Just Observing = MOJO. Lot’s of thing may provide mojo but for me, the camera has to support this while we work.

I was on North Broad Street near the convention Center. I’m walking South and I saw these doors, no signs, nothing. I kept walking and then in my head, I saw the doors transform to b& w and have some kind of a sinister feel. Like there’s some powerful being like the wizard making things happen. Yeah, I’m telling ya true. I stopped, closed my eyes and then turned around and walked the 1/2 block back. I stood there and framed in my minds eye and thought, well, this is like The wall or Paul Strand and then I heard Pink Floyd in my head. I looked right and left, many people walking by but no connection. Then aall the sudden, this gut walks closer, closer, and then he kinda hunches down…….Click! I felt invisible and the man never saw me, just another brick in the wall………….

I like Andre’ on a neck  strap but I can’t because shortly my shoulder and back start to hurt. So he’s on a wrist strap. Not just any strap but a Luigi’s. There becomes different methods of working like this. I don’t do blind hip shots anymore but I do things with Andre, cause he’s in the hand. The way you work and respond is effected by how you carry the camera. A neck strap supports blind shooting and also shows you are not trying to sneak up on people etc. A wrist strap forces you to see and work differently as you are more stealth. I don’t care about stealth as I just am working and if two drug dealers are doing a deal, well, I’m not likely to both with them. Business is business and I have my own to attend to.

Back in the 70’s George Krause  https://georgekrause.com/and Ray Metzker http://www.laurencemillergallery.com/artists/ray-metzker worked the streets in a way not attempted before. The thing is that they both did images here in Philly and City Hall was a point of interest. I stay aware of this work as it has influenced me for decades.

Andre’ and I were walking thru the underpass in City Hall. I love the light in and around it and it captures my vision daily. I used to walk around City Hall with Edmund Bacon and that was a lesson in human architecture not learned in college.  Ed showed me many things that made up the bldg and where stone masons put signatures and things for the generations to come.

I was walking thru and saw this woman coming in from the light. She’s walking with a comfort in safety and looking as innocent as any woman can look. Then as she drew closer, this guy stands up from the dark shadows and I looked …..Click. What does this have to do with a wrist strap vs a neck strap? Draw your own conclusions.

I have a thing for juxtaposition. Finding and seeing and making the relationship between things and people always fascinated me. As I continued South on Broad Street I noticed a window and the reflections kinda grabbed me. I looked at it and felt a photo was there but needed someone or thing to make it right for me. No one is around but Andre; the Fuji X100F and me. his disciple. I was ready to walk away and Andre’ kinda made me breathe and wait. I knelt down to tie my shoe and as I got up, besides the back pain….Click. I mean that fast, she was there and I had a fraction of a second. Andre the Fuji X100F was at the ready and we made it. I don’t care who likes this or not, I do. Go mess with your work in your head and don’t bother me.

No comment deeded. I love this and stand by it. This is not a comment, if it had been a comment I would care what the comment was but it is in fact not a comment. It is not a post comment but a not a comment comment.

Enjoy friends. There are a few of you that have asked so I will answer. I do feel the Fuji X100F is in a class of it’s own. It’s got MOJO. I can’t really explain what that means but we all do understand it. The cameras that have it we keep and love and work with. The cameras without MOJO, well….small potatoes Michael…….

I’ll try to post again over the weekend……………………. be blessed y’all

 

 

18 thoughts on “April 6th, 2017 … Thoughts, Photos & Mojo … Fuji X100F

    • Well my friend, there is a sense of freedom using the X100F. The idea that some see it’s single lens as a restriction boggles my mind. I see it as a freedom to eliminate a variable of focal lengths that I find very creative.
      If you get the X100F to play, you will probably have to pay.

  1. Hi Don,
    Going to have to re-read this post a time or two.
    Or maybe I should leave it till I am anywhere near your experience.
    Either way,I know there is a whole lot that I can learn from it.
    Cheers, Ian.

    • Thanks Ian. Ya know learning is the key and for me, I learn as I do things including write this blog.
      Glad you get something out of it ….don

  2. Hey Don,
    Nice to see your process when you’re on the streets. Thanks for sharing. I wanted to try something different and I bought the 27 mm pancake for my Fuji XE2. But the thing is that my Ricoh GRD IV is glued to my hand… The 27 mm is taking dust… I’m thinking of Selling it. So I can understand when you said that André’s got the MOJO. Something hard to explain, but you can feel deep inside that you and your camera are only one. That’s how I feel with my Ricoh camera at the time.

    Cheers Don !

    • Jean,
      Most Ricoh shooters agree that the Holly Grail for Ricoh is the 28mm and 40mm. The focal lengths compliment each other perfectly. I wouldn’t dump that lens so quickly my friend. Take both cameras out and listen to what they have to say….

      Peace, don

  3. Hey Don!

    A year ago I sold her, Irene, my X100T. And since then I miss her… And I gotta say, reading your Blog ain’t helped – darn, now I decided to trade in my X-Pro2 to get a new Irene, the Fuji X100F! Incoming in 2 wks, many thanks for the inspiring images & the MOJO, man!

    Cheers to you Don!

    • Hey Hendrik,
      Let it be said and let it be known, the Fuji X-Pr02 is a fine camera but big, oh yeah, big. The lovely, elegant Irene is a lady that will tolerate no others besides her in your process. I personally find the Fuji X100F to be a very inspiring camera. I’m sure you will have a similar experience and when she comes home to you, you’ll see the MOJO.

      best, don

      • Dear Don!

        thanks for your true words (unfortunately there ain´t many around who talk true): yes, she don´t allow no one else next to her (hell I´m gonna have a tough time explainin´ that to my wife … 😉 my X100F will carry the same name as my X100T coz the spirit of that camera never changed!

        anywayz I´m subscribed to your Blog & will report back as soon as Irene´s arrived and taken me out on an imaging tour

        take care & wish you all the very best of light

        best, Hendrik

        • Hendrik,
          I agree about the spirit of a camera transferring to the next generation. Andre’ was first named in 1971 on my Black Lac M4. Can’t wait till the little lady gets home to you. Keep me posted please.
          don

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